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Forum: Radio Mods
 Topic: Audio Modification for Icom IC02 and IC04 Radios
Audio Modification for Icom IC02 and IC04 Radios [message #63] Sun, 25 June 2006 16:38
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
This audio mod works on the 02 and 04AT. It increases the level of audio, as well as rolling off some of the lows. Sounds real nice. It involves the circuit around Q105.

1. Replace C119 with a .01 uF cap (disc ceramic is fine).

2. Parallel R131 with a 1 uF cap (use a tantalum cap).

3. Parallel R132 with a .01 uF cap (disc ceramic is fine).

This is not the same mod as the one International Radio is advertising, which involves changing C117.

I tried an AB-1 Audiolaster from Engineering Consulting, and was very unhappy with the results. I am very pleased with the audio given by this mod (much cheaper too!).
----------------------------------
 Topic: Icom IC02 PL Out of Band Modification
Icom IC02 PL Out of Band Modification [message #62] Sun, 25 June 2006 16:36
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Registered: December 2004
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The following method of modifying the Icom IC02. This one should give you PL out of band without jumpering 5 VDC to the tone chip. Use 1N914 or equivelent when adding diodes.

1. On the logic matrix, remove D402 and D403.

2. Add D402, D403 and D404 with the cathode at 4 o'clock and the anode at 12 o'clock.

3. Retune the VCO to cover your desired frequency spread. My 02AT did not want to go beyond 163 MHz. I have a friend whowas able to get his to the low 170s.

4. To jump from 140 to 150 or from 150 to 160 (or vice versa) you must "tune across" the boundry, in the same way that you do for an unmodified 02AT. For example, key in 149.995 and then move up until you are in the 150s. You can then enter any 150 MHz frequency (starting with the MHz).

-----------------------------


***->Be careful not to transmit out-of-band, or accidentally operate on any non-amateur, unless you are authorized to do so.

DO NOT JEOPARDIZE YOUR LICENSE!
 Topic: Expanding Functions for the IC-V8000
Expanding Functions for the IC-V8000 [message #58] Mon, 08 May 2006 23:54
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
This PDF contains content on the ICOM V-8000:

1. RX Frequency Expansion
2. TX Frequency Expansion
3. ANI Function
4. Voice Scrambler Function
5. MIC Gain Level
6. Wide and Narrow Function

Click here for the PDF document for these function mods

[Updated on: Mon, 08 May 2006 23:55]

 Topic: Icom IC-2720H Out of Band Mod
Icom IC-2720H Out of Band Mod [message #57] Fri, 28 April 2006 23:23
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
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 Topic: Alinco DR-600 Mod Extend TX/RX
Alinco DR-600 Mod Extend TX/RX [message #54] Fri, 28 April 2006 23:05
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
Hi, I just got the info on how to modify the Alinco DR-600. I have activated these mods and they seem to work fine. Here they are:

Mod 1 - Activate 108 - 142 MHz and 810 - 998 MHz Receive
--------------------------------------------------------

Remove head unit from radio and open it up.

Inside you will see a red and blue wire.

Cut the red wire.

Open the main unit and attach a wire to CN-205. This will be your antenna for 810-998 MHz.

Close everything up.

Reset the CPU by holding down the FUNC key while you turn the radio on.

To use: The VHF key toggles between 108-142 and 2m. This toggle only works in VFO mode.

The UHF key toggles between 810-998 and 70cm. This toggle only works in VFO mode.



Mod 2 - Extened tx/rx on 2m and 70cm
------------------------------------

Remove head unit from radio and open it. (2 screws on back)

Inside you will see a red and a blue wire.

Cut the blue wire.

Put everything back together.

Reset the CPU by holding down the FUNC key while you turn the radio on.

You can now transmit and receive on the following freqs: 130-174MHz and 400-517MHz

Be carefull!!!!! You can now transmit outside of the HAM bands. Don't do this! If you do you WILL get caught and the FCC loves those $10,000 fines.



NOTE: I take no responsibility for these modifications. If you blow up your radio it is not my fault. If you have any questions about these mods call Alinco.



Chris Levin levin@cosmic.physics.utah.edu
 Topic: BC2500XLT Cellular Mod
BC2500XLT Cellular Mod [message #53] Fri, 28 April 2006 23:02
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
I have never tried this mod. I have one page which I received from Grove about this modification for cellular restoration.

The page notes that the modification may not be really necessary, because you can still hear the cellular communications in the image frequencies 21.6 MHz higher that the true cellular ranges. Thus, you will hear cellular calls in the 894.01 to 915.60 MHz range on your BC2500XLT without modification.

If you really want to do the modification, here are the step-by-step directions. Most of what follows is copied verbatim from the Grove sheet, which does not have a copyright notice on it. Therefore, I'm bassuming it's OK.

1. Remove the antenna and battery pack from the BC2500XLT. Lay it on its face on a soft cloth or towel, bottom of the radio facing you. Remove the two upper (black) and two lower (chrome) screws.

2. Carefully pry the back loose from the radio and lift it off. Similarly, grasp the visible circuit board by the edges and carefully pull it away from the radio just far enough to separate it from the white (11 pin) Molex connector. Do not stretch the remaining ribbon connector. Lay the board alongside the radio.

3. Locate microprocessor chip "UNIDEN UC-1513A", the speaker, and the battery terminals. Below the microprocessor and above the speaker and battery terminals, locate the cluster of chip resistors marked "104". Using a magnifier and fine-point soldering iron, unsolder the lower-left-most chip resistor and move it one place to the left, soldering it in place.

Cellular restoration is now complete. Rebassemble the radio by reversing steps 1 and 2, and test it by entering 879.990 MHz. Search steps in this range will be the correct 30 kHz.

As I said, I have not tried this modification, so I can't testify to whether it really works. Grove states that Grove Enterprises bassumes no responsibility for damages or other liability resulting from attempting to duplicate this procedure. It is possible (probable?) that this modification may void your warranty.

Also keep in mind that there are at least two versions of the BC2500XLT. I don't know whether these modification applies to all versions.

Finally, the obligatory note to remind you that monitoring mobile telephone conversations, including cellular, is against federal law.
 Topic: Cherokee AH-50 HT Mods
Cherokee AH-50 HT Mods [message #52] Fri, 28 April 2006 22:58
root  is currently offline root
Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
Hello,
Here is an output power mod for the popular Cherokee AH-50 6 meter handie talkie. It is the first mod I've ever seen for this radio. Regular high output is just under 5 watts. After this mod you can get about 6-7 watts output while using an external 12 volt dc input and on low power about 3 watts is typical.

1.Remove all external screws and carefully pull apart the unit. Be careful not to lose the rubber PTT and feature button pads that will become lose while doing this as well as the plastic slider that locks the battery pack and power cord in place.

2.You will notice there are two separate,sandwiched circuit boards that make up the unit, one is the CPU and LCD display, the other is the RF component section. Gently pull the display board free of the RF section. They are joined together by a multi-pin terminal.

3. With the RF section fully exposed you should see a metal grounding pad that covers the underside of the RF section as well as the rf output coaxial wire. Desolder the legs of the grounding pad, as well as the lead of the coaxial wire closest to the BNC and move the grounding pad to the side, exposing the underside of the board. Use extreme caution as there are multiple surface mount components very close to these points.

4.Find the main output transistor-2SC2078 marked "C2078". It very easy to spot. It is screwed onto the radio's heatsink. With the grounding pad moved, you can now desolder the three pins on this transistor and remove. Replace with a 2SC2166. Be sure to use heatsink compound on the back of the new transistor and the heatsink during replacement. Locate an inductor with a core behind and to the left of the output transistor. There is a small hole in the heatsink above it for tuning. Tune this and all the other spring-like coils around the output final for maximum output at 53 MHZ. Make sure the radio is set on high power for this! You should see close to 6-7 watts output now, instead of the stock 4.8 watts. Rebassemble radio in reverse order and enjoy. Don't forget the radio will put a big strain on your battery pack on high power with the higher output. It is advisable to use low power setting with battery use and high only when an external 12v source is applied.

'73 KB3HAZ
 Topic: Alinco DJ-160 Mods
Alinco DJ-160 Mods [message #51] Fri, 28 April 2006 22:55
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
The new Alinco DJ-160 Radio will receive between 137-174 Mhz, and transmit in the 2Meter band only (144-148Mhz). A simple modification to the radio will enable it to transmit in the full range it receives currently. I have not tested the output power on other frequencies (Due to my one and only watt meter getting fried)however I have tried setting a weather receiver a small distance away, and I did hear the radio in the receiver. To make the mod, the following must be done: (I bassume that you have some experience with electronics and that you can tell a wire from a resistor, from a transistor)

1) Take the battery of the radio by lifting the battery release button. If you look at the bottom of the radio, there will be a metal plate that is held on with 4 small screws. Take this plate off, noting exactly how the clip was held on (like the slot for the battery release clip)

2) On the back of the radio there are two screws that hold the back of the radio on, take these screws out.

3) Now you should be able to lift the bottom part of the radio by the battery release button slightly apart. I was told that you should take the top knobs off, but I found that I didn't have to.

4) If you take the Battery Release Button and turn it about 90 degress, the button should come out easily. After you get the small piece of plastic that is the button, you should see a yellow wire behind where the clip was.

5) Take a small wire cutter and CUT this YELLOW wire. You should probably make sure that the wire doesn't have bare metal showing from a lousy cutter, because I don't think that grounding this wire to the case would be HEALTHY for your radio. Smile

6) After You cut this wire. bassemble the radio, and just before you turn on the radio, do a power reset by holding the FUNC button while turning on the radio. This will reset the radio to ALL of the factory set parameters. YOU WILL LOOSE PROGRAMMED FREQUENCIES that were programmed into the memory mode of the radio, so just write the frequencies down before proceding with the above instructions.

7) The radio should be just like new, except that the transmit will be enabled for ALL frequencies! GOOD Luck!
 Topic: Kenwood TM-2550 Mars/Cap
Kenwood TM-2550 Mars/Cap [message #46] Fri, 31 March 2006 23:49
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
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The TM-2500 series radios may be easily modified for use on MARS/CAP frequencies from 141-150.995mhz. Locate the control unit (X54-1860-XX) on the bottom of the radio. This is the same board that the TU-7, and or MU-1 are mounted on. Just to the left of IC3 you will find a row of diodes. Cut diodes D8, and D11. After the diodes have been cut you will have to "reset" the microprocessor. Microprocessor Reset. 1. Press and hold the [PS] key. 2. Turn ON the power switch. 3. Release the [PS] key. All of your programmed data such as memory channel data, DCL data, and Phone number data will be erased and you will have to reprogram them. If the radio is not reset, it will not recognize that you have cut the two diodes.
 Topic: Kenwood TS-940s IF-10C Serial Interface
Kenwood TS-940s IF-10C Serial Interface [message #43] Sun, 19 March 2006 23:36
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
The TS-940s inside serial interface is not available now so here is a solution.

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface

Kenwood TS-940s Serial Interface
 Topic: IC-208H Extended RX-TX mod
IC-208H Extended RX-TX mod [message #42] Sun, 12 March 2006 17:33
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Messages: 195
Registered: December 2004
Senior Member
  • Place the radio with the front panel toward you and bottom side / speaker side UP.

  • Remove the (4) screws located in each corner.

  • CAREFUL! Go slow, you will need to disconnect the speaker cable while removing the cover.

    Look at the lower right hand corner of the main printed circuit board.

  • You should see a silver crystal with the number "D196D3C" printed on it.

  • Just above the crystal, you should see an (8x8) matrix pad (see below diagram).
    o o   o o   o o   o o
    o o   o o   o o   o o
    o o   o o   o o   o-o   <-- Remove
    o o   o o   o o   o-o   <-- Remove
    

    Note: there are ONLY (2) resistors in place. (Bottom right and the one directly above it).

  • REMOVE BOTH RESISTORS [Do NOT attempt this unless you know how to use a low wattage soldering iron]



  • RESET THE RADIO, hold the [SET LOCK] and [S.MW-MW] buttonsdown during power-up.

    DONE! New RX/TX Ranges

    118.0000  -  135.9875    RX-AM only
    136.0000  -  173.9875    RX & TX (15% RF power fall-off at lower freq, Full 
                             power at high freq)
    230.0000  -  399.9875    RX only
    400.0000  -  478.9875    RX & TX (Do NOT transmit below 410MHz on HI-PWR, 
                             VSWR fold-back)
    479.0000  -  549.9875    RX only
    810.0000  -  849.0000    RX only
    849.0000  -  869.0000    RX only
    894.0000  -  999.9875    RX only
    

    Author: KD4CWB
  •  Topic: IC-7000 Fan Mod - Cool as ice
    IC-7000 Fan Mod - Cool as ice [message #40] Tue, 07 March 2006 01:09
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member

    READ ALL OF IT BEFORE PREFORMING THE MOD!

    Use a baby thermometor ( the electric kind w/ the digitial readout ) and see just how hot your rig is running before preforming the mod, I know most all of my readings were over 106F then the thermometer errored out as the temp was too high.

    Tempurature Measurements were made with a baby-tempurature thermometor ( sorry its all I had at the time ).

    Heres the Proof!

    ----------------
    top - left front 94.6F
    top - left rear 103.8F
    top - right front N/A (below 85.5F unable to get reading)
    top - right rear 92.7F
     
    Right side front 90.6F
    Right side rear 91.5F
     
    Left side Front 95.0F
    Left side Rear 98.1F
     

    After cw keying for aprox 5 min continous duty the heat generated by the IC-7000 did rise enough to enable to the temp control circuit. Heres the good news!

    Once the temp control circuit kicks in, the fan goes into high-rpm mode!!! Then returns to 'normal' operation with the 2W / 100ohm resistor voltage.

    So with this mod, you get a dual speed fan without any additional modifications!!

    Forgot to mention, when you goto solder the lead to the red wire of the fan, please place a rag or something undeneath the area you will be working in ( its pretty tight ) to prevent any unwanted solder dripping down onto the main board.

    When closing everything all up, there is a little pink sticky pad ontop of the cover unit to access the mars/cap and tvro mod. Place your wire so its right on top of the sticky pad. Seemed to be the best place for it at the time.

    Options, the Red wire from the fan connecter to the main board could be snipped between the connector and the solder joint to avoid any complications with the temp circuit enabling.

    Additionally, the back left of the rig, still feels warm to the touch but its more of a luke-warm, instead of what it was previously which was excessivly hot. The back right, front left and front right all feel cool to the touch.

    Im sure there are better ways of preforming this modification, although just stealing 0.14A from the 12v+ DC on the tuner port seemed to make the most sense, since an LDG Tuner only uses 300mA when in operation.

    Although I do not know how this will affect the autotuner as I do not have one, I am unable to test this modification with an autotuner, such as the LDG Z11 or Z100.

    Your Icom 7000 Running Hot? ... Heres the FAN mod!
    ( This has been untested with an inline tuner )

    1. Tuner Lead #3 is +12v DC, tap into Tuner Lead #3 with a wire ( theres enough room to simply slip a solid copper wire into the crimp for lead #3 )

    2. Add a 100ohm Resistor at the other end of the solid copper wire ( a 100ohm pot will work if you wish to be able to vary the speed of the fan )

    3. Strip the insulation of the red wire to the fan back just enough to make a solder connection to the 100ohm resistor / 100ohm pot. We used a lighter to burn away a bit of the insulation in the middle of the wire b/t where it connects to the board and where it connects to the fan itself.

    Wrap it all up with some electrical tape to prevent grounding. and Whala! Your Done!!

    Tuner Port on back of the IC-7000
    ^
    1
    2
    3 +12v DC -> wire -> 100ohm resistor -> fan red wire
    4
    -
    

    A 100ohm Pot could be used instead of a resistor, values below the 100ohms will increase fan speed.

    0 resistance - sounds like an airplane.

     Topic: Extended Frequency Enhancements for the Yaesu FT-23R(2M), FT-33R(220), and FT-73R(70cm)
    Extended Frequency Enhancements for the Yaesu FT-23R(2M), FT-33R(220), and FT-73R(70cm) [message #35] Wed, 14 December 2005 00:21
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    Greetings and hello radio amateur operators.

    The topic is increasing the functional frequency coverage of what has been probably Yaesu's most popular handheld tranceivers.

    To save manufacturing costs, Yaesu engineers designed multiple personalities in the same CPU module found in the FT-23R, FT-33R,UHF FT-73R and the FT-2008/7008 tranceiver. The FT-2008/7008 tranceiver is the commercial version of the Ft-x3R series.

    Unique features of this mod include
    • the just say Mao feature (**)
      (NO FREQUENCY READOUT: Ch 1 thru Ch 9 appear on your display.
      Great when you aren';t looking and some fellow ham tries to rip off your simplex frequency)

    • the GREAT WHOPPER
      (opens the CPU to 50-300 Mhz or 220-550 Mhz coverage. Full (.100 Mhz to 999.9995 Mhz) adjustable freq coverage available so far only on the FT-33R;this doesn't mean you can actually transmit but the Activity light goes in TX and you get a good fake RF bargraph that indicates that you can transmit on 750 MHz.
    How to do it:
    1. Contemplate invalidating your warranty. No beginners beyond this point. If you don't know how to solder, don't learn here. Ask an elmer to bassist.

    2. If you treasure your memories, write out your contents of your radio on a piece of paper. When you make the changes, the CPU runs a small diagnostic and see that the jumpers have been changed. It will ERASE ALL PRIOR SETTINGS.

    3. Dissbassemble your tranceiver.

    4. Find the line of solder connections running down the CPU board. GENTLY move all wires aside so you won't melt them.

    5. Using solder wick and a Good low-power soldering Iron, see chart. Read special notes for the FT-33R.

    6. Rebuild radio and count your blessings.

    (**)NO FREQUENCY READOUT

    Removal of the solder bridge labeled number nine will activate the commercial side of the CPU module. To flip to the amateur mode, you would press F UP Arrow. To flip to the commercial mode, you would press F Down Arrow.

    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+= FT-23, FT-73R Chart =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
    
       50 to 300 Mhz spread        220 to 550 Mhz spread
       --------------------        ---------------------
    
       Open bridges 8,9            Open bridges 7,8,9
    
    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
    +=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=FT-33R Chart =+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=+=
    
    Same chart as above, but I wanted to add my experience of the Yaesu FT-33R 220 Mhz radio.
    When I removed number 7 and then did a cold reset , the CPU cleared and showed me a L and a freq. I put .100 in.
    Press D/MR. Then a U appeared. I turned the VFo knob until 999.999 appeared. Press D/MR.

    I also had to reenter the Repeater Split to the proper value.

    On the VFO, I could QSY down to those limits (using F UP/DN) and listen to my local Channel 13 on 215.720/.660.

    Yes, 216-220 Mhz is available with this mod. Great if 216-220 is the next 220 subband.

    Notes
    1 Cold Reset of the CPU Board.
    With the radio upright and your nose pointing at the CPU board, look at the Lower Right Corner of the CPU chip. You will see two parallel SMT resistors. Below them is a screw with possibly a paper washer. To the right is a SMT device (it's a cap) with a pointed end facing Left. Ground that point to the screw or to the case with a flat screwdriver. Awhile doing that, cycle on/off the radio to ensure a good reset. Remove screwdriver and then rebassemble radio.

     Topic: Modification FT-27 expanded frequency range
    Modification FT-27 expanded frequency range [message #34] Wed, 14 December 2005 00:19
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member

    Remove the screws holding battery track and rear cover.
    Locate the "CONTROL UNIT".
    Close jumpers 1, 3, 7, AND 8.
    Rebassemble the radio.
    Turn on the radio and program it as following:
    "1" 135.000 PRESS D/MR THIS IS LOWER RX LIMIT
    "2" 185.000 PRESS D/MR THIS IS UPPER RX LIMIT
    "3" 135.000 PRESS D/MR THIS IS LOWER TX LIMIT
    "4" 185.000 PRESS D/MR THIS IS UPPER TX LIMIT

    Press and hold D/MR, T and REV while TURNING ON if you need to reset or reprogram the radio.

    Notes:

    Jumper 5 is for 25 KHZ steps default value.
    Jumper 9 is for battery back-up.
    Jumper 10 is for 1750 HZ repeater tone access.


     Topic: Yaesu FT-26 Expanded Frequency
    Yaesu FT-26 Expanded Frequency [message #33] Wed, 14 December 2005 00:18
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    1. Remove the battery and antenna.

    2. Remove the four screws holding the back track.

    3. Remove the two screws in the back case.

    4. Carefully seperate the front cover.

    5. Locate and remove solder on jumper pad 10. (on the control board)

    6. Apply solder to jumper pads 1,3,7 and 8.

    7. Rebassemble the radio.

    8. Turn radio on and each channel indicater will blink.

    9. Enter the following frequencies. (use the [F] and up arrow keys)

    CH.1 135.000 Press [D/MR] Lower Rx limit
    CH.2 174.000 Press [D/MR] Upper Rx limit
    CH.3 135.000 Press [D/MR] Lower Tx limit
    CH.4 174.000 Press [D/MR] Upper Tx limit

    I accept no responsibility or liability for the results of any modification.
    Performing modifications and the use of modified radios may be a violation of laws.If you have any doubts do not perform any modifications.

     Topic: Yaesu FT-10 Extended Transmit Mod for 140-174MHz use
    Yaesu FT-10 Extended Transmit Mod for 140-174MHz use [message #32] Wed, 14 December 2005 00:06
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    1. Remove antenna and battery.

    2. Locate the Ni-Cd battery sticker on the back of the radio chbassis. Pry up the corner of the sticker and peel it off carefully.

    3. Remove the two screws located under the sticker. These retain the keypad.

    4. Slowly lift off the keypad. Use care not to dislodge the gasket.

    5. Locate and unsolder the 0 ohm chip resistor at location "M" (see diagram below).

    6. Re-install keypad with two screws. Be sure gasket is properly seated.

    7. Replace the Ni-Cd sticker if desired. Reattach battery and antenna.

    8. Press down and hold the Top-Notch and Lamp button while turning the radio on.
       | knob |
     +---------------------+
     |  +---------------+  |
     |  |  LCD Display  |  |
     |  |               |  |
     |  +---------------+  |
     |  -----------------  |
     |  -----------------  |
     |  -----------------  |
     | (on/off) ---------  |
     |                     |
     |  +---------------+  |
     |  |    Ribbon     |  |
     |  |    Cable      |  |
     |  |    ||||||     |  |
     |  |  o         o  |  |
     |  |         ::    |  |
     |  |           #:  |  |
     |  +---------------+  |
     +---------------------+
    
    # = Lohoneyion "M", chip resistor to remove
    The board may actually has an "M" near the correct resistor.

    [Updated on: Wed, 14 December 2005 00:12]

     Topic: Icom 32AT Open Transmit for VHF & UHF
    Icom 32AT Open Transmit for VHF & UHF [message #21] Sun, 03 July 2005 23:51
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    MODS FOR ICOM 32AT

    1. Remove battery and antenna.
    2. Loosen two screws on top of unit as much as possible without removing them.
    3. Loosen 4 flat head screws on bottom of unit 1 turn.
    4. Loosen 2 screws near PTT switch 1 turn.
    5. Remove 4 black screws on back of unit.
    6. Lift bottom of front cover .25 inch, slide it down .25 inch, then lift front cover up 1 inch.
    7. Disconnect plug on 4 wires coming from the speaker.
    8. Lay front panel on table up-side down being careful of the flex circuit.
    9. All mods are done to the back of the front panel. Notice places for 5 axial diodes, which I will call 1 through 5, 1 being nearest the display. Add/remove diodes so there are diodes in positions 3 and 5. This will open up receive coverage for VHF & UHF and enable keyboard entry of the 10 MHz digit.
    10. Notice 4 surface mount resistors slightly left of center directly above the speaker, lined up in a row. Solder the anode (the side without the bar) of two diodes to the right side of the lower of the four caps. Now find the CPU. It\'s the PGA under the shield near the top of the board. Find the row of pins on the CPU nearest the speaker. Notice the the 8th pin from the right has a thicker trace coming from it. Now notice that there are small solder pads about .25 inch toward the speaker on both the fat trace and the two traces to the right of it. Solder one each of the cathodes of the 2 diodes to the solder pads on the two smaller traces. This will open up the transmit for VHF & UHF.
    11. Put unit back together in reverse order.

    This procedure worked for my unit (and many others), but I can\'t guarantee it will work for yours.

    Bill Pherigo
    WR0Y
     Topic: Special Buttons on IC706mkII
    Special Buttons on IC706mkII [message #17] Sat, 26 February 2005 16:00
    kc2nda  is currently offline kc2nda
    Messages: 31
    Registered: December 2004
    Location: New Paltz
    Member
    I have tried some special buttons on IC706mkII:

    Push TS and DISPLAY while power up and you will see a strange power on check.

    Push P.AMP/ATT and RIT/SUB while power up and you will be able to see SHIFT-ADJ on your 706mkII. Dont know what this is for, recalibrating ?

    I think that these things even works on the older version of 706, dont know.

    73 - Dennis, SM6WXO @ SM6JZZ
     Topic: More talk power on SSB from your Icom 706Mk2/Mk2G and Alinco DX70TH
    More talk power on SSB from your Icom 706Mk2/Mk2G and Alinco DX70TH [message #16] Sat, 26 February 2005 15:58
    kc2nda  is currently offline kc2nda
    Messages: 31
    Registered: December 2004
    Location: New Paltz
    Member
    The following adjustments are to increase the average talk power on SSB for the above radios. If your radio is still under warranty, check with your supplier to ensure warranty will not be invalidated



    For both these adjustments you will need a very small cross-point screwdriver and a steady hand! Do not proceed if you are not confident!



    Alinco DX70TH: Turn up the microphone gain as detailed in the manual. This should be set to maximum. The adjustments described here is concerned with the ALC control. ALC action is indicated by the TX light which should glow brighter when speaking into the microphone.

    Remove the top cover and locate the high power/50w switch (this switch location is detailed in the manual, it is the only switch visible under the top cover). To the left of the switch there should be a small pot which is for the ALC. Just above the pot printed on the circuit board is 100w. Set the radio to 28Mhz and while speaking into the mike turn the pot counter clockwise until the TX light just fails to glow brighter. Back off slightly to restore the increase in brigthness of the TX light while speaking into the microphone. Replace the top cover.

    This adjustment increases talk power considerably and for local contacts on SSB the compressor should be switched off.

    Icom 706Mk2/Mk2G: The Icom 706 series are notorious for low talk power on SSB. A simple tweek of the ALC can solve the problem. This procedure was published in Radcom July 1999 but is updated here to include the IC706Mk2G. As far as I can ascertain, the later model 706MK2G seems not to suffer from the problem of low talk power and this mod may not be necessary. Remove the top cover. At the front edge of the main circuit board (to the left of the crystal filter slots, with the front of the radio facing you) should be a small pot. In the 706Mk2 this is R511 and in the 706Mk2G it is R579 (the number is not actually printed on the board!). The pot may be obscured by printed ribbon. This pot needs to be turned clockwise while speaking into the microphone, with power set to high and microphone gain at 6 (compressor should be switched off). Adjust for maximum talk power.

    The article in Radcom claims that this adjustment will bring the 706Mk2 up to 100w pep without the need for the compressor. For the 706MK2G (early models), adjusting R579 can give a dramatic increase in talk power although you will find that you will still need to have the microphone gain turned up to 10 and the compressor switched on. On my own set I have noticed that some bands give more talk power than others. On 160, 80 and 2 meters I get nearly full power by speaking into the mike (gain at max and compression on). However on other bands the increased talk power is not so dramatic particulalry on 10, 20 meters).

    Another way to boost the talk power on the 706 series is to use a preamplified microphone. If you do decide on a preamplified microphone reset R511/R579 back to it\\\'s original postion or distortion may result.

     Topic: Icom V8000 MARS Mod - STRAIT FROM ICOM
    Icom V8000 MARS Mod - STRAIT FROM ICOM [message #14] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:55
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    Here is the Icom MARS modification that I requested from the manufacturer and had to show proof of MARS licensing. They sent me this picture in the form of a PDF. I zoomed it in a lot so you could see it. In the picture the diode is removed. You can cut the solder leads with a razor or thin knife.
     Topic: IC-746 improved AGC and weak signal volume
    IC-746 improved AGC and weak signal volume [message #13] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:47
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    In the service manual under 5-4 RECEIVER ADJUSTMENT.

    For setting the RECEIVER TOTAL GAIN.

    Part 1 follow as written.
    Part 2, set R761 for 178mV (-15dB).

    This gives a better(lower) AGC knee signal level and during weak signal reception maintains good volume level without having to manually advance the volume control. This is especially useful for Six and Two metre weak signal work.

    The noise blanker, general AGC action and S meter calibration were not adversely affected.
     Topic: IC746:Using 500Hz filters on SSB for Dig Modes
    IC746:Using 500Hz filters on SSB for Dig Modes [message #12] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:45
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    Hi there!

    I ran usually my old TS440S-AT with 500Hz IF filters on USB mode for the Pactor lev 1 and 2, and for PSK31 very weak signals.
    Some week ago I found in a Ham fair an FL100 CW filter for the IC746 at a bargain price, and in the last days it happened to me to have some time to devote to our hobby, and so I installed the 9 Mhz IF filter for 500Hz, FL100, on the IC746 for pactor 1 and 2 and psk31, as I am used to.

    I followed the instruction on page 78 of the ICOM user manual.
    After returning all the covers on, I went to page 60 of the instruction manual, to select the installed filter for the 9MHz-1 position.
    I selected the FL100 . Then I went on page 42 for filter program mode setting as suggested on the page 60.
    Note on the top of page 42, at the beginning of the chapter 5-11, 1st paragraph: \" Optional filters ....omissis...
    .. Filters can be independently selected for each operating mode.\"
    And so I went to program mode setting and pushed the \"filter\" button for 2 seconds and then choosed to program the CW and the SSB-Narrow for 9M on 500Hz and 455k for 2.4 k ..... but - surprise - the FL100 was not available on SSB!

    I suspiciously read carefully the manual and find nothing on selecting filters depending from mode choosen..... or relation between filter type and/or bandpbass sensing... nothing. So I went to the usual \"dirty trick way\" to gamble with the filter program mode setting: I told the IC746 that the installed filter was an SSB Narrow 1.9kHz one, the FL223 type. All OK , hi hi ....

    Then I went again on the procedure of page 42, and set the SSB-N filter mode for 9M \"1.9 kHz\" (hi!) and 455k at 2.4kHz.

    It runs OK having now bandpbass of 500Hz on SSB-N mode available for Pactor lev1 and lev 2, and PSK31. On the TS440SAT I had to correct for the IF filter frequency moving the IF bandpbass slightly clockwise to fit it for the selected tone pair (1200-1400 Hz or 1400-1600 Hz) and the same had to be done on the IC746: selecting as usual USB I had to tune the outer larger one of the twin bandpbass tuning about 90 degrees clockwise.
    This proved to be quite a god setting for operation on USB Pactor level 1 and 2 using high tones.

    I tested some lower tone pair compatible with the CW bandpbass (but take care of the CW Pitch setting!!! it should be tuned fully clockwise or you\'ll get no audio out!) and tested with 400-600Hz, 500-700Hz and 600-800 Hz , but although the PtcII controller I use is very versatile on this respect, my ears are not, and so being used to \"by ear search and pre-tuning\" and then \"spectra fine tuning\" I endly went back to the usual 1500 Hz center frequency. I got 1500 Hz as I am also using pactor level3; before it I was using 1300 Hz center.

    Here people using other controllers like KAM+ or alike have to adjust their bandpbass tuning depending on the tones frequencies they use.

    Actually I have not yet the FL52A 500Hz 455kHz filter; if I\'ll find it at bargain price I\'ll buy it and test it;
    I saw by now that having 2.4 kHz bandpbass on 455 kHz works.

    I have to say that apart from this test and related trick to get the 500Hz bandpbass for USB digital RX, I would not suggest asnecessary to buy and install such filters on the IC746 : with the PtcII controller you may work very well on pactor, psk31, rtty and other 500Hz bandpbass modes on the IC746; (do not use the DSP and or NB, NR sometimes\'s good, some others no)

    The same applies for the soundblaster software programs like Digipan or others, the normal bandpbass is more than adequate, and you may taylor it using the twin bandpbass tuning.

    I recommend the narrow filters on TS440sat and alike: more,I suggest on them to replace also the 455kHz filters with other that have better performances (IN-RAD has some good ones) and the old good TS440S will copy nicely and happily very low level digital signals.

    I hope this notes will be useful for some reader, I will appreciate any feedback on this matter.

    Thanks and 73 de I2JJR Augusto
     Topic: IC-746 Backlight Repair
    IC-746 Backlight Repair [message #11] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:44
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    Here you go guys, here is the repair mod for the backlight.

    Remove top and bottom cover.


    Remove the 4 screws holing on the face, 2 on left and 2 on right of face holding it to chbassis. Theres 1 ribbon cable connecting the face to main unit, just pull strait out.


    Remove knobs just by pulling them off. VFO just pulls off also.


    Unplug all ribbon cables on back of face, number them with a permanent marker if you think you might mix them up.


    There is 5 screws holding the top circuit board in, take them out and lift up board, be carefull and feed 2 of the ribbon cables through the board. On the back side of this board there are 2 steel boxes on the board. Take the top off of the biggest one.
    You will see a small square transistor with the #B1201 on it. This is the problem transistor thats been giving backlight problems.

    This transistor has no way of cooling laying flat on the board.remove this at your own risk. You have to have a small tip iron and a good set of eyes and steady hands. The center leg on the transistor is cut off, this is the ground leg, and the top of the trans is soldered to the board.

    Heat the top of the transistor and lift it and it will come loose,then unsolder the legs and lift. Remember which way it came out. Take the new trans and don\'t cut the center leg off, the center leg needs to be soldered where the top of the transistor was soldered. And the other 2 where they were from the start, leaving the part standing up instead of laying flat on the board.

    Now push the transistors side against the metal box and put some heatsink compound around the transistor and between the part and box, now it can keep cool.

    Thats it, put the top back on and put the unit back together. Replacment part #s are NTE2525 or 2SA1244 or 2SB1201, good luck and take your time.

    Works well
     Topic: IC-746 modulation on AM
    IC-746 modulation on AM [message #10] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:43
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    If you want more crisper and louder modulation on AM, turn radio upside down and remove cover at the top right hand corner of radio you will see a varible that says (AM mod). Clockwise increases mod and counter clockwise decreases mod. You might want to use another radio on the same frequency so you can hear results. The radio that you are listening with needs no ant screwed in to it being that you are only listening.

    I have done this and mine has loud crisp modulation. Remember, no compression on AM, you will find that it will muffle you on AM.

    Do at your own risk.

    73s
     Topic: Monitor Audio Output Too Low Icom IC-746
    Monitor Audio Output Too Low Icom IC-746 [message #9] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:43
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    The monitor function on the IC-746 tends to have low output compared to receiver AF volume, therefore in order to listen to yourself, you have to increase the volume. When the PTT is released back to receive mode, the AF setting nearly blows your speaker or your headphones.

    If the monitor audio output is too low on your ICOM 746, you can add 4.7K resistor in parallel with R1087. This brings up the gain of IC1082 to a more reasonable level that can still be controlled by the monitor level function but with plenty more gain.

    Technical Notes:

    These SMDs are located in the Main Board. You will probably need a service manual to locate these parts on the main board. Adding modifications to these very small parts requires some skill and a good magnifier together with the appropriate tools. A 1/8 Watt resistor will be suitable for this modification, but still require some precision.
     Topic: Power mod for the ICOM IC-746
    Power mod for the ICOM IC-746 [message #8] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:42
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    Power mod for the ICOM IC-746
    Remove bottom cover.

    Find the voice module plug-in.Right behind it you will see 4 pots

    R993 144 mhz power adj
    R991 50 mhz power adj
    R989 HF bands power adj
    R990 AM power adj

    You can tweak these to up the power suggest on hf doing it on 40 meters. you can get close to180 watts on 40-75 meters about 125 to 150 on 20-10.

    The pots are very small be careful not to use something to big. the are all metal pots.

    NI4L

    [Updated on: Sun, 06 May 2007 12:50]

     Topic: Extended RX/TX for IC-746
    Extended RX/TX for IC-746 [message #7] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:41
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    Open the bottom cover of the IC-746
    Place radio on surface upside down with front to your left.


    Find chip label HD6433042SFB24
    To the right of this chip (3/4 inch) are two rows of diodes.


    14 diodes in the right column and 7 diodes in the left column.

    For Icom 746 Radios with the diodes in the 1, 2, 6, 7, 9, 11 and 14 positions, remove numbers 6 and 7 leaving the other 5 in place.
    Mod complete.
     Topic: Separating the Tx and Rx lines on 2 meters in the IC746 could not be easier
    Separating the Tx and Rx lines on 2 meters in the IC746 could not be easier [message #6] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:40
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    Separating the Tx and Rx lines on 2 meters in the IC746 could not be easier.

    Put the rig on the bench with the front panel facing towards you, and turn upside down, with the front panel still facing towards you.

    Remove the bottom cover.

    At back-left there is a 5 inch square metal screening plate held in place by four screws - remove it.

    You will see a miniature co-ax plug and cocked, labeled VRX. Simply unplug, tuck the original plug out of the way and plug in a new plug attached to a length of miniature coax, which can neatly leave the rig through the hole on the back panel that contains an earth bolt. Now you have your separate receive input!

    You could cut off and re-use the miniature co-ax plug, but I preferred to contact my local Icom dealer and buy a new one (a couple of dollars) - the Icom description is: PLUG TMP-P01X-A1 (Min Coax) IC-125.

    73
    David, G4YTL

    [Updated on: Wed, 29 December 2004 01:40]

     Topic: IC-746 (USA models) All Band TX Modification
    IC-746 (USA models) All Band TX Modification [message #5] Wed, 29 December 2004 01:38
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    This information is to help clear the confusion about the ICOM IC-746 modification for out of amateur band transmissions. There are a couple of different mods floating around for the IC-746. For USA models, the following information is the ONLY mod for the IC-746! I verified this with my contacts at ICOM. They verified that this was the ONLY modification for the IC-746 (USA model) and that there were NO others. I then performed the modification and the radio transmits from about 100KHZ to 60MHZ and 118MHZ to 176MMZ so be careful with this mod!

    Read the following instructions all the way through before performing this mod. Perform this modification ONLY if you feel capable of soldering VERY small surface mount diodes! Do this totally at your own risk.



    ------------------------------------------------------------ --------------------

    Turn the radio upside down and position the front panel to your right. The main tuning knob will be to your lower right and the microphone connector to your upper right. This will orientate the radio in the proper direction to read the parts layout identification silk screening. (Note: the IC part numbers will be UPSIDE DOWN.)

    Remove the twelve screws from the sides and bottom securing the bottom cover.

    Locate the Circuit board with the Optional IF filters. The filters will be in the upper left hand corner of the circuit board. Look to the lower middle of the circuit board for silk screening that reads “Option UT-102”. (almost the center of the radio) Immediately to the right of the “Option UT-102” silk screening you will see two columns (14 positions in each column) of VERY small surface mount diodes in a tight configuration. I’ll call them diode positions 1-14. This column should have diodes in EVERY position 1-14. The next column to the right is diode positions 15-28. This column should have diodes in positions 15, 18, 20, 22, 23, 27 and 28 as shown below.

    [01] [15]
    [02] [ ]
    [03] [ ]
    [04] [18]
    [05] [ ]
    [06] [20]
    [07] [ ]
    [08] [22]
    [09] [23]<-- Remove this diode only!!!
    [10] [ ]
    [11] [ ]
    [12] [ ]
    [13] [27]
    [14] [28]

    Diode 23 is VERY small and has a small “Y” on top of it. Use the finest pair of tweezers you have to remove diode 23 ONLY! Make sure you remove diode 23 only and NO other diodes! Make sure you have NO solder bridges as the diode pads are VERY small!

    Use a clear piece of tape and tape the diode to one of the metal covered cans near the columns in the same orientation you removed it. This way you’ll have your diode to reinstall if you ever feel you need to and you’ll know the orientation of the diode.

    This completes the TX modification. Replace the cover and screws.

    TX should be from about 100KHZ to 60MHZ and 118MHZ to 176MMZ.

    Do this totally at your own risk. Never, transmit out of the ham bands or your privileges.

    73

    Lyndel, N7LT
    Forum: Cellular
     Topic: UTStarcom CPE1134 Circuitry - Hack
    UTStarcom CPE1134 Circuitry - Hack [message #3108] Sat, 06 June 2015 02:29
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    How may of us wanted to know what was inside a cell phone? For the amount of money paid for this cellphone: ($10) with no contract. Only a US passport and the green piece of paper! You can't go wrong with an electronic tinkerer wanting something to play around with.

    USStarcom Circuit Board

    This phone was packing an ARM processor (meant specifically for cell phones) with several other chips. The other chip must be a memory module for the processor. Nothing fancy there.
    ARM MT6223DA

    The next chips are the SKY77542 which is a transmit and receive front-end module (FEM) with an integrated Power Amplifier Control for dual-band cellular GSM900 and DCS1800, and the AD6548 which is a complete GSM.GPRS Transceiver. These do the actual cellular communihoneyions.
    SKY77542

    The next chip is the AR1010. This chip is a complete FM Radio Receiver. This can be used to receive FM radio stations between 76 - 108MHz. This was the best part of the phone =)
    AR1010 FM Receiver

    [Updated on: Sat, 06 June 2015 03:03]

     Topic: How Cell Phones Work
    How Cell Phones Work [message #60] Wed, 14 June 2006 23:44
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    Cell Phone Codes
    All cell phones have special codes associated with them. These codes are used to identify the phone, the phone's owner and the service provider.
    Let's say you have a cell phone, you turn it on and someone tries to call you. Here is what happens to the call:

    When you first power up the phone, it listens for an SID (see sidebar) on the control channel. The control channel is a special frequency that the phone and base station use to talk to one another about things like call set-up and channel changing. If the phone cannot find any control channels to listen to, it knows it is out of range and displays a "no service" message.

    When it receives the SID, the phone compares it to the SID programmed into the phone. If the SIDs match, the phone knows that the cell it is communicating with is part of its home system.

    Along with the SID, the phone also transmits a registration request, and the MTSO keeps track of your phone's location in a database -- this way, the MTSO knows which cell you are in when it wants to ring your phone.

    The MTSO gets the call, and it tries to find you. It looks in its database to see which cell you are in.

    The MTSO picks a frequency pair that your phone will use in that cell to take the call.

    The MTSO communicates with your phone over the control channel to tell it which frequencies to use, and once your phone and the tower switch on those frequencies, the call is connected. Now, you are talking by two-way radio to a friend.

    As you move toward the edge of your cell, your cell's base station notes that your signal strength is diminishing. Meanwhile, the base station in the cell you are moving toward (which is listening and measuring signal strength on all frequencies, not just its own one-seventh) sees your phone's signal strength increasing. The two base stations coordinate with each other through the MTSO, and at some point, your phone gets a signal on a control channel telling it to change frequencies. This hand off switches your phone to the new cell.

    Let's say you're on the phone and you move from one cell to another -- but the cell you move into is covered by another service provider, not yours. Instead of dropping the call, it'll actually be handed off to the other service provider.

    If the SID on the control channel does not match the SID programmed into your phone, then the phone knows it is roaming. The MTSO of the cell that you are roaming in contacts the MTSO of your home system, which then checks its database to confirm that the SID of the phone you are using is valid. Your home system verifies your phone to the local MTSO, which then tracks your phone as you move through its cells. And the amazing thing is that all of this happens within seconds.

    The less amazing thing is that you may be charged insane rates for your roaming call. On most phones, the word "roam" will come up on your phone's screen when you leave your provider's coverage area and enter another's. If not, you'd better study your coverage maps carefully -- more than one person has been unpleasantly surprised by the cost of roaming. Check your service contract carefully to find out how much you're paying when you roam.

    Note that if you want to roam internationally, you'll need a phone that will work both at home and abroad. Different countries use different cellular access technologies.

    Let's take a good look inside a digital cell phone.

    Inside a Cell Phone
    On a "complexity per cubic inch" scale, cell phones are some of the most intricate devices people use on a daily basis. Modern digital cell phones can process millions of calculations per second in order to compress and decompress the voice stream.

    Let's talk about what some of the individual chips do. The analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion chips translate the outgoing audio signal from analog to digital and the incoming signal from digital back to analog.

    The microprocessor handles all of the housekeeping chores for the keyboard and display, deals with command and control signaling with the base station and also coordinates the rest of the functions on the board.

    The ROM and Flash memory chips provide storage for the phone's operating system and customizable features, such as the phone directory. The radio frequency (RF) and power section handles power management and recharging, and also deals with the hundreds of FM channels. Finally, the RF amplifiers handle signals traveling to and from the antenna.

    The display has grown considerably in size as the number of features in cell phones have increased. Most current phones offer built-in phone directories, calculators and games. And many of the phones incorporate some type of PDA or Web browser.

    Some phones store certain information, such as the SID and MIN codes, in internal Flash memory, while others use external cards that are similar to SmartMedia cards.

    Cell phones have such tiny speakers and microphones that it is incredible how well most of them reproduce sound. The speaker is about the size of a dime and the microphone is no larger than the watch battery beside it. Speaking of the watch battery, this is used by the cell phone's internal clock chip.

    What is amazing is that all of that functionality -- which only 30 years ago would have filled an entire floor of an office building -- now fits into a package that sits comfortably in the palm of your hand!

    In 1983, the analog cell-phone standard called AMPS (Advanced Mobile Phone System) was approved by the FCC and first used in Chicago. AMPS uses a range of frequencies between 824 megahertz (MHz) and 894 MHz for analog cell phones. In order to encourage competition and keep prices low, the U. S. government required the presence of two carriers in every market, known as A and B carriers. One of the carriers was normally the local-exchange carrier (LEC), a fancy way of saying the local phone company.

    Carriers A and B are each assigned 832 frequencies: 790 for voice and 42 for data. A pair of frequencies (one for transmit and one for receive) is used to create one channel. The frequencies used in analog voice channels are typically 30 kHz wide -- 30 kHz was chosen as the standard size because it gives you voice quality comparable to a wired telephone.

    The transmit and receive frequencies of each voice channel are separated by 45 MHz to keep them from interfering with each other. Each carrier has 395 voice channels, as well as 21 data channels to use for housekeeping activities like registration and paging.

    A version of AMPS known as Narrowband Advanced Mobile Phone Service (NAMPS) incorporates some digital technology to allow the system to carry about three times as many calls as the original version. Even though it uses digital technology, it is still considered analog. AMPS and NAMPS only operate in the 800-MHz band and do not offer many of the features common in digital cellular service, such as e-mail and Web browsing.

    Forum: Alinco Mods
     Topic: Alinco DR1200T Full Band Mod
    Alinco DR1200T Full Band Mod [message #3098] Wed, 29 April 2015 01:06
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    Alinco DR1200T Full Band Mod

    Step 1. Remove 2 screws located on top of cover.
    Step 2. Loosen the 4 screws on both sides of top cover (do not remove).
    Step 3. Remove top cover
    Step 4. Locate Yellow wire Loop behind tuning Knob (this wire loops from
    the control board mounted on front pannel).
    Step 5. Cut loop and tape ends.
    Step 6. Replace top cover.
    Step 7. Reset radio (press 'F' and VCO/M keys together. While holding
    down keys turn off and on Power).

    Factory settings will be restored however the new frequency range will
    be from 132 to 173 MHz. Any memory will have to be reprogramed.
    These insructions are from Alinco, I've done them to my set and
    it works great.
     Topic: Alinco DR-110 Full Band Mod
    Alinco DR-110 Full Band Mod [message #3097] Wed, 29 April 2015 01:04
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    Alinco DR-110 Full Band Mod

    tep 1. Remove 2 screws located on top of cover.
    Step 2. Loosen the 4 screws on both sides of top cover (do not remove).
    Step 3. Remove top cover
    Step 4. Locate Yellow wire Loop behind tuning Knob (this wire loops from
    the control board mounted on front pannel).
    Step 5. Cut loop and tape ends.
    Step 6. Replace top cover.
    Step 7. Reset radio (press 'F' and VCO/M keys together. While holding
    down keys turn off and on Power).

    Factory settings will be restored however the new frequency range will
    be from 132 to 173 MHz. Any memory will have to be reprogramed.
    These insructions are from Alinco, I've done them to my set and
    it works great.

    This modification also works on the DR1200T and DR112 radios. Frequency range
    when applied:

    130.000 - 169.995
    340.000 - 379.995
    870.000 - 889.995
     Topic: Alinco DJ-580T Air and Out of Band Mod
    Alinco DJ-580T Air and Out of Band Mod [message #3096] Wed, 29 April 2015 01:00
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    Alinco DJ-580T Air and Out of Band Mod

    This is a very simple mod it will give you aircraft band RX,
    from 108-130 Mhz AM. On the first part and RX/TX from 130Mhz-
    170Mhz on VHF and 415 - 470 Mhz on UHF (Approximate).

    1. Remove the battery from the radio.
    2. Look at the bottom of the radio where the battery mounts.
    3. Locate four screws that hold the battery mounting plate to the
    bottom of the radio. Remove these four screws.
    (Be careful, the screws are SMALL!)
    4. The battery plate is still attached by two wires but there should
    be enough slack in them to get around the plate with a pair of
    cutters.
    5. With the radio's keypad and display facing up, locate a loop of
    red wire on the right side of the radio interior.
    6. Cut this wire for AM Aircraft band RX.
    7. On the left side of the interior, locate a loop of blue wire.
    8. Cut this wire for TX/RX as described above.
    9. Insulate the exposed ends of these wires so they do not short.
    10.Re-attach the battery mounting plate and replace the battery.
    11.With the radio off, hold down the function key and turn the
    radio on.

    73 de Tom/N6ZXY@W6QFK.#SOCA.CA.USA.NA
     Topic: Alinco DR-430 Extend Transmit Mod
    Alinco DR-430 Extend Transmit Mod [message #3093] Sat, 28 March 2015 02:51
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    Alinco DR-430 Extend Transmit Mod

    This is the Alinco DR-430 Extended TX modification. This modification will expand TX coverage to
    403-499 MHz. Please follow the steps and do the work CAREFULLY! This modification works great
    in my rig and I assume this modification will work on almost all 430's (no warranty implied).

    1. Unscrew the 3 small screws on the top cover.
    2. Gently remove the top cover.
    3. Cut the little loop wire (blue) that's located just behind the display, 2" left from the Power
    button.
    4. Reassemble the radio.
    5. Reset the radio's CPU by turning power ON while pressing the F key.

    73's & DX de Eduardo "Ed" Sweet - LU7AKC.
    Packet radio: lu7akc @ lu7akc.#col.cf.arg.soam
    Internet: postmaster@asarin.org.ar
     Topic: Alinco DJ-560-T Extend Transmit Frequencies Mod
    Alinco DJ-560-T Extend Transmit Frequencies Mod [message #3092] Sat, 28 March 2015 02:49
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    Alinco DJ-560-T Extend Transmit Frequencies Mod

    The following modifihoneyion to the Alinco DJ-560-T will enable it to transmit out of band. Rumor: may
    also enable cross-band repeat.
    1. Turn power off.
    2. Remove battery.
    3. Unscrew stainless steel battery connector plate. This is the rectangular s/s plate found at the
    bottom of the unit and is held in place with (4) small chromed, Phillips head screws.
    4. Remove Antenna.
    5. Unscrew the one black head, Phillips head screw found immediately adjacent to the BNC.
    6. Carefully remove the grey DIAL, UHF and VHF plastic knobs.
    7. Unscrew the lock ring nuts that are found under each of the three sets of knobs.
    8. Gently remove the plastic top cover on the unit.
    9. Unscrew the (4) black head Phillips screws that hold the body halves together.
    10. Place the unit face down on a work surface that is covered with a towel or a similar soft cloth.
    This will protect the unit from being marred while you work on it.
    11. Gently separate the two body halves about 1/2" to 3/4".
    12. Cut the ORANGE wire loop and reseal the exposed ends with heat shrink tubing.
    (NOTE: if your DJ-560T is serial numbered from #0636-0705, the loop will be YELLOW in
    color! However whichever the color, cut only the loop! It will be the only loop to be found!)
    13. Reassemble the unit in the reverse order of the above instructions.
    14. Reset the CPU by holding the 'F' key (above the PTT key) down and turning on the unit.

    [Updated on: Sat, 28 March 2015 02:49]

     Topic: Alinco DJ-120 Extend Frequency Mod
    Alinco DJ-120 Extend Frequency Mod [message #3091] Sat, 28 March 2015 02:47
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    Alinco DJ-120 Extend Frequency Mod

    Hi all, i have recently heard of a mod for the alinco dj-120. The mod opens up transmit from 130
    mhz to 174 MHz.
    To do this, please folow these simple procedures:
    1. Open the front and top case of the ht.
    2. Look for 2 jumpers, one vertical, on horizontal next to the microprocessor and cut both of
    them.
    3. Reset the microprocessor by pressing the reset button on front panel.

    Be careful! that will reset all memories stored in the radio
     Topic: ALINCO 22T/E.24E/T Microphone Wiring Pinout
    ALINCO 22T/E.24E/T Microphone Wiring Pinout [message #3083] Wed, 18 March 2015 00:58
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    ALINCO 22T/E.24E/T Microphone Wiring Pinout

    1. Mic
    2. PTT
    3. Down
    4. Up
    5. +8 Volts
    6. N/C
    7. Mic Earth (ground)
    8. Ground

    ALINCO 22T/E.24E/T Microphone Wiring Pinout
    View from front of transceiver

    [Updated on: Wed, 18 March 2015 01:02]

     Topic: ALINCO DMR610 DR-135 DR-435 Microphone Wiring Pinout
    ALINCO DMR610 DR-135 DR-435 Microphone Wiring Pinout [message #3082] Wed, 18 March 2015 00:54
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    ALINCO DMR610 DR-135 DR-435 Microphone Wiring Pinout

    1. Mic
    2. PTT
    3. Down
    4. Up
    5. +5 Volts
    6. Remote Control
    7. Screen Earth (ground)
    8. Ground

    ALINCO DMR610 DR-135 DR-435 Microphone Wiring Pinout
    View from front of transceiver

    [Updated on: Wed, 18 March 2015 00:55]

     Topic: Alinco DJ-162 Mod Extended RX/TX
    Alinco DJ-162 Mod Extended RX/TX [message #2997] Sat, 06 July 2013 01:09
    root  is currently offline root
    Messages: 195
    Registered: December 2004
    Senior Member
    Extended RX/TX for Alinco DJ-162

    1. Remove the battery pack. Remove the battery plate from the bottom of the radio.
    2. Remove the back cover from the radio. This is a tedious process. You must take the knobs off the top and remove the top plate first.
    3. Under the Battery clasp on the side of the radio (The little sliding thumb switch that keeps the battery from falling off the radio) you will find a yellow loop of wire. This loop is small and hard to get to. You will need a very small pair of cutters or scissors.

    --Cut this wire.

    4. Put the radio back together

    5. Reset the radio. (You will lose your memories)

    6. Go to the VFO mode.
    Pressing the 'B' key on the keypad will now allow
    you to cycle through the extended rx bands. It will cycle from 2 mtrs, am aircraft, to 800. The radio does NOT have the guts to receive 800. It just happens to be in the processor so don't waste your time listening.

    7. This same jumper also opens extended transmit.

    Ron Wright - KA5LUG
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